Back To Top

Artist

Gallery Exhibitions

Museum Exhibitions & Projects

Store

Artist Bio

Teresita Fernández

PRESS

The Brooklyn Rail

May 1, 2017

PRESS

The Art Newspaper

March 4, 2017

News

The future of the arts is Latinx: Q&A with artist Teresita Fernandez

October 5 2016

PRESS

Art21

September 24, 2016

News

Discovering the World From Nature's Many Perspectives Hyperallergic

December 31 2015

News

Women in Art: Teresita Fernández

November 30 2015

News

At Grace Farms, Encountering Art at Every Bend New York Times

November 28 2015

News

Interview with Sculptor Teresita Fernández Aesthetica Magazine

November 24 2015

News

Sculpting the Public: Teresita Fernández Wants You In Her Work Modern Painters

October 31 2015

News

Grace Farms Draws Praise Stamford Advocate

October 19 2015

News

The Spiritual and Spectacular Meet at an Ultramodern Community Center in Connecticut New York Times

October 16 2015

News

Poetry Under Fata Morgana Organized by Teresita Fernández and Emanuel Xavier

September 17 2015

PRESS

ArtNexus Teresita Fernández. Fata Morgana.

August 11, 2015

PRESS

Arte al Dia International

June 2015

PRESS

Cultured Magazine

April 18, 2015

PRESS

WSJ Artist Teresita Fernández Transforms New York’s Madison Square Park

March 31, 2015

PRESS

Departures Magazine Artist of the Moment: Teresita Fernández

January 9, 2015

PRESS

Gothamist Massive 500-Foot-Long Canopy Coming To Madison Square Park

November 11, 2014

PRESS

New York Times

November 6, 2014

PRESS

Modern Art Notes Podcast

August 18, 2014

PRESS

W Magazine

July 17, 2014

PRESS

The Brooklyn Rail

July/August 2014

PRESS

Sculpture

November 2013

PRESS

Art Bahrain

Fall 2013 - Winter 2014

PRESS

Architectural Digest

October 2013

PRESS

Modern Painters

October 2013

PRESS

South China Morning Post

September 26, 2013

PRESS

Whitewall

February 1, 2013

PRESS

W Magazine

October 2012

PRESS

The Wall Street Journal

September 14, 2012

PRESS

Artinfo

September 12, 2012

PRESS

Bloomberg

September 5, 2012

PRESS

Whitewall

November 30, 2011

PRESS

W Magazine

November 30, 2011

PRESS

The New York Observer

September 19, 2011

News

White House Appoints Artist Teresita Fernandez to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts

September 2011

PRESS

Art in Asia

August 31, 2011

PRESS

Artdaily

May 26, 2011

PRESS

artdaily

January 31, 2011

PRESS

Artinfo

November 16, 2010

PRESS

Financial Times

April 9, 2010

PRESS

Bob Magazine Issue 67

February 28, 2010

PRESS

Artforum

February 28, 2010

PRESS

Art Lies

February 28, 2010

PRESS

Monocle

October 31, 2009

PRESS

Anne Stringfield Interview

October 31, 2009

PRESS

David Norr Essay

October 31, 2009

PRESS

Dave Hickey Essay

October 31, 2009

PRESS

Annette DiMeo Carlozzi Essay

October 31, 2009

PRESS

The Business Times

September 19, 2009

PRESS

Artforum

August 31, 2009

PRESS

St. Petersburg Times

August 23, 2009

PRESS

Dallas Morning News

August 8, 2009

PRESS

...might be good

February 6, 2009

PRESS

Blackbird

August 31, 2008

PRESS

Vogue

April 1, 2007

PRESS

Tema Celeste

October 22, 2005

PRESS

USA Today

September 20, 2005

PRESS

ArtNexus

June 1, 2005

PRESS

ArtReview

April 1, 2005

PRESS

Art + Auction

March 1, 2005

PRESS

Art in America

November 1, 2003

PRESS

Art in America

March 1, 2003

PRESS

Art in America

December 1, 2001

PRESS

ARTnews

September 1, 2001

PRESS

New York Times

March 21, 1999

Artinfo


Through a Glass Greenly: Teresita Fernandez on Her Reflective Landscapes and Seascapes
Juliette Soulez

PARIS— An artist who works in the landscape tradition, Teresita Fernandez is known for her museum installations, especially "Blind Blue Landscape" at the Benesse Art Site in Naoshima, Japan, and "Stacked Waters" at Texas's Blanton Museum of Art. Her monumental installations often question the ways that nature is represented through industrial processes, using various materials, from stone to acrylic.

While Fernandez is well known in the United States — she was the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation "genius" grant in 2005 — she is now having her first solo show in France, at the Almine Rech Gallery. Featuring her "Nocturnal" series, which consists of several graphite seascapes, the show also includes intriguing sculptural works made of small glass cubes and leaves of precision-cut stainless steel. Fernandez shared her thoughts with ARTINFO France on her first Paris show, the ideas behind her water scenes, and how viewers can see themselves in her art.

How do you feel about having your first Paris show?

I'm thrilled to work with the Almine Rech Gallery and to show my work in a Parisian setting. A large part of my previous work was based on the formal gardens of 17th-century France, with the idea of a romanticized landscape that was intermediary and deliberately manipulated, with a phenomenological approach to place. So the work I'm showing here is completely part of this context.

Since you hail from Miami, do these works also refer to a Florida setting?

No, not really. I'm from Miami but I've lived in New York for 15 years — New York is also surrounded by the ocean. Really, water in my works is an abstract reference, more an idea than a specific place. I am interested in showing how an image can lead viewers to project themselves onto it, how they can be caught in a situation without ever being able to name something specific. It's less about the image than about the desire of the viewer to be immersed in a vision that sometimes resides in the production of a few horizontal lines.

Is there a difference for you between working in a gallery or outdoors?

These are two totally different situations. Working on a landscape in a real landscape creates conceptual problematics that never come up in the context of a gallery or a museum. I am interested in what can happen between the two, and I think in some way that my work occupies the very tenuous space between internal and external landscapes.

What were you trying to achieve with the images of the shards of mirror in "Double Dissolve?"

With "Double Dissolve," each little reflective glass cube becomes something like a miniature landscape painting. If you stand far away from the piece, what you see is a reflection of the landscape panorama of the graphite piece behind you. The closer you get, the more you see the details of the landscape behind you. I am fascinated by the idea of turning your back on something in order to see it — which is a totally different way of seeing.

The shadow of your sculpture "Mirrors" appears as a green light on the gallery wall. Is this a kind of secondary representation of nature in shadow?

The green light of this piece emanates from the sculpture itself. It's just green paint that is reflected onto the white walls of the gallery. There isn't any artificial light source. This piece reflects us in the act of looking. Your own reflection is abstract and ends up mingling with the pattern of the leaves. The landscape here is anthropomorphic, meaning that when you look at this piece, it looks back at you.