Back To Top

Gallery Exhibitions

Museum Exhibitions & Projects

Store

Artist Bio

Nari Ward

PRESS

Museum Magazine

August 31, 2017

PRESS

Artnet

May 18, 2017

PRESS

The New York Times

January 27, 2017

News

The New York Times

July 8 2016

News

Nari Ward brings Mango Tourists and other exotics to the Barnes Foundation The Philadelphia Inquirer

June 25 2016

News

Nari Ward: The story behind an artwork in the artist's own words Modern Painters

June 1 2016

News

Sculpture Finds a Parking Space on the High Line Wall Street Journal

April 30 2016

News

Sculpture Finds a Parking Space on the High Line Wall Street Journal

April 27 2016

News

An Artist and a Poet Capture Death in a Hospice Room T Magazine

April 16 2016

News

A Sense of Placeness High Line Magazine

April 14 2016

News

Homegrown philanthropy fuels the new Speed Art Museum The Art Newspaper

March 10 2016

News

Video: Nari Ward show at Pérez Art Museum Miami Miami Herald

February 21 2016

News

The Historical and Fictional Worlds of Nari Ward Hyperallergic

February 11 2016

News

Nari Ward with Nicole Smythe-Johnson Miami Rail

December 12 2015

News

Nari Ward’s found object sculptures explore history and power Financial Times

December 4 2015

News

Book Signing with Nari Ward Pérez Art Museum Miami

December 3 2015

News

Nari Ward Looks Back at Two Decades of Work in "Sun Splashed" at PAMM

November 28 2015

News

Art Basel Week 2015 Guide: At the Museums Miami Herald

November 26 2015

News

In 'Breathing Directions,' Nari Ward Gathers Layers of African-American History New York Times

October 30 2015

News

Nari Ward at Lehmann Maupin Art in America

October 30 2015

News

25 Most Collectable Midcareer Artists: Nari Ward Artnet

September 30 2015

News

See: Nari Ward's Breathing Directions New York Magazine

September 26 2015

News

Timeless Symbols Pack Nari Ward’s Sculptures with Meaning The Creators Project

September 24 2015

News

Nari Ward BOMB Magazine

September 17 2015

News

Nari Ward: Breathing Directions at Lehmann Maupin Elephant Magazine

September 16 2015

PRESS

Forbes

March 27, 2015

PRESS

Forbes

March 25, 2015

PRESS

Forbes

March 24, 2015

PRESS

Design & Trend

March 10, 2015

News

Nari Ward’s "Divination X" to Grace Gardner Museum Façade Boston Magazine

January 5 2015

PRESS

Artnet News

June 9, 2014

PRESS

Sculpture Magazine

June 2013

PRESS

Frieze

May 2013

News

Mousse Magazine Nari Ward interviewed by Anna Daneri

April 2013

News

New York Times Review 'NYC 1993' Exhibition at New Museum

February 14, 2013

PRESS

The New York Times

February 14, 2013

News

Whitewall Magazine Installation View: Nari Ward's 1993

February 1, 2013

PRESS

Whitewall

February 1, 2013

News

New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York Nari Ward: Amazing Grace

January 17 - April 21, 2013

PRESS

The Wall Street Journal

January 16, 2013

PRESS

ARTnews

January 2013

PRESS

The Brooklyn Rail

April 30, 2012

PRESS

New York Observer

April 27, 2012

PRESS

Huffington Post

April 8, 2012

News

Nari Ward Receives Rome Prize

April 2012

PRESS

Designboom

March 31, 2012

PRESS

Artinfo

March 27, 2012

PRESS

Modern Painters

January 31, 2012

PRESS

Philadelphia Weekly

November 2, 2011

PRESS

International Review of African American Art

November 30, 2010

PRESS

ARTnews

April 30, 2010

PRESS

Art in America

April 30, 2010

PRESS

Artforum

April 30, 2010

PRESS

The New York Times

April 2, 2010

PRESS

Frieze

December 31, 2008

PRESS

The New Yorker

November 24, 2008

PRESS

The New York Times

August 24, 2007

PRESS

Sculpture

March 31, 2006

PRESS

Sculpture

April 30, 2005

PRESS

Art in America

November 30, 2004

PRESS

V Magazine

December 31, 2001

PRESS

The New York Times

August 6, 2000

PRESS

The Observer

October 27, 1997

PRESS

The New York Times

August 10, 1997

PRESS

The Village Voice

October 9, 1996

PRESS

Flash Art

September 30, 1996

PRESS

Elle

June 30, 1995

Art in America


Art in America
December 2004

Nari Ward at
Deitch Projects
By Sarah Valdez

Nari Ward didn't need to use actual, smelly codfish in order to make his first solo show in New York in eight years off-pulling. But he did it anyhow. The Harlem-based artist-who grew up in Jamaica, immigrated to the United States at the age of 12 and now teaches at Hunter College-set up a "reading room" in the small, dingy basement of Deitch Projects' sprawling Wooster Street gallery; a rectangular wooden table sprinkled with salt, upon which he arranged bits of dried, malodorous fish in a decorative pattern. On the table, framed pages from a monograph of artworks in the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Robert Lehman Collection rested behind Plexiglas of the sort used for check-cashing windows, with holes for speaking through. The catalogue illustrations are accompanied by tedious descriptive text written by Lehman's son; "the virgin has golden-brown hair" or "the electrical tape and feathers. According to the artist, these "Copulation Works" resemble sexual positions, including Doggy, 69 and Missionary, none of which revealed themselves to me. For another sculpture, Ward appropriated from an immigration office a scratched-up plastic desk with tattered advertisements for Czech beer and Arizona iced tea still stuck to it. conjuring up the dismal experience of getting a pointedly shabby reception while attempting to acquire citizenship in the richest country in the world.

Tackling the challenge of filling up the largest gallery, Ward stuck the rear ends of more than 300 black television sets on a wall. On the protruding parts, he draped pieces of white Kleenex, perhaps alluding to the stark loneliness that comes from TV-induced emotion. For another installation, he strung up plain white bath towels on a laundry line, cordoning off the nicest piece in the show and unfortunately keeping viewers from seeing it up close. Glory, a horizontally oriented tanning booth is made from an oil barrel. The black stars and stripes on the glass shelf inside led me to imagine a person with emblems of nationality grotesquely emblazoned on his or her skin; it also obliquely brought up the all-too-messy relationship involving the U.S., oil and Arab countries.

With his anti-precious esthetic and vague references to race, I got from this show the general sense that Ward is angry at the United States and pissed off about the impact of our empire on the rest of the world. Who could blame him for that? And what could be more pertinent right now?