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Teresita Fernández

PRESS

The Brooklyn Rail

May 1, 2017

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The Art Newspaper

March 4, 2017

News

The future of the arts is Latinx: Q&A with artist Teresita Fernandez

October 5 2016

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Art21

September 24, 2016

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Discovering the World From Nature's Many Perspectives Hyperallergic

December 31 2015

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Women in Art: Teresita Fernández

November 30 2015

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At Grace Farms, Encountering Art at Every Bend New York Times

November 28 2015

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Interview with Sculptor Teresita Fernández Aesthetica Magazine

November 24 2015

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Sculpting the Public: Teresita Fernández Wants You In Her Work Modern Painters

October 31 2015

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Grace Farms Draws Praise Stamford Advocate

October 19 2015

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The Spiritual and Spectacular Meet at an Ultramodern Community Center in Connecticut New York Times

October 16 2015

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Poetry Under Fata Morgana Organized by Teresita Fernández and Emanuel Xavier

September 17 2015

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ArtNexus Teresita Fernández. Fata Morgana.

August 11, 2015

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Arte al Dia International

June 2015

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Cultured Magazine

April 18, 2015

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WSJ Artist Teresita Fernández Transforms New York’s Madison Square Park

March 31, 2015

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Departures Magazine Artist of the Moment: Teresita Fernández

January 9, 2015

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Gothamist Massive 500-Foot-Long Canopy Coming To Madison Square Park

November 11, 2014

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New York Times

November 6, 2014

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Modern Art Notes Podcast

August 18, 2014

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W Magazine

July 17, 2014

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The Brooklyn Rail

July/August 2014

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Sculpture

November 2013

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Art Bahrain

Fall 2013 - Winter 2014

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Architectural Digest

October 2013

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Modern Painters

October 2013

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South China Morning Post

September 26, 2013

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Whitewall

February 1, 2013

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W Magazine

October 2012

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The Wall Street Journal

September 14, 2012

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Artinfo

September 12, 2012

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Bloomberg

September 5, 2012

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Whitewall

November 30, 2011

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W Magazine

November 30, 2011

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The New York Observer

September 19, 2011

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White House Appoints Artist Teresita Fernandez to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts

September 2011

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Art in Asia

August 31, 2011

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Artdaily

May 26, 2011

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artdaily

January 31, 2011

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Artinfo

November 16, 2010

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Financial Times

April 9, 2010

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Bob Magazine Issue 67

February 28, 2010

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Artforum

February 28, 2010

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Art Lies

February 28, 2010

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Monocle

October 31, 2009

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Anne Stringfield Interview

October 31, 2009

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David Norr Essay

October 31, 2009

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Dave Hickey Essay

October 31, 2009

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Annette DiMeo Carlozzi Essay

October 31, 2009

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The Business Times

September 19, 2009

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Artforum

August 31, 2009

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St. Petersburg Times

August 23, 2009

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Dallas Morning News

August 8, 2009

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...might be good

February 6, 2009

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Blackbird

August 31, 2008

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Vogue

April 1, 2007

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Tema Celeste

October 22, 2005

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USA Today

September 20, 2005

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ArtNexus

June 1, 2005

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ArtReview

April 1, 2005

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Art + Auction

March 1, 2005

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Art in America

November 1, 2003

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Art in America

March 1, 2003

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Art in America

December 1, 2001

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ARTnews

September 1, 2001

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New York Times

March 21, 1999

Art Lies


Art Lies
No. 65, Spring 2010

Teresita Fernández
The Blanton Museum of Art
By Lawrence Jennings

The immediate effect of walking under Teresita Fernández' sculpture Vertigo (sotto in su) is to have one's intuitive sense of gravity thrown off kilter. Part of Blind Landscape, a mid-career survey at the Blanton Museum, the work features shaped planes of polished aluminum suspended above viewers' heads. The mirrored layers hang parallel to the floor, canopylike, and are cut to resemble foliagelike camouflage patterns. Countless openings in their surfaces allow light from above to shine through, casting intricate shadows on the adjacent wall. This complex interplay of changing light, overlapping shadows and stratified depth is reminiscent of looking upward through tree branches. However, any romantic or cliché view of nature is quickly dispelled, confounded by the sight of one's own reflection and that of the museum floor—by the out-of-body experience of looking down at oneself.

Portrait (Blind Landscape) seems to reference Spanish moss, while Portrait (Blind Water) resembles a glacial icefall. The unseen backsides of these otherwise metallic works are painted bright green and blue, respectively. As a result, light, reflected between the white wall, the colored backside, and layers of metal, creates a tinted glow in and around each work. These and other installations in the show bring to mind the perceptual effects of Op Art, specifically Bridget Riley's dot paintings from the mid 1960s. From a distance, Projection Screen (Black Onyx) appears to be hundreds of black circles arranged as a cinematic 4:3 rectangle on the wall. Closer inspection, however, reveals that the circles are actually convex onyx stones affixed firmly to the wall. The dark stones change in size near the work's edges, creating the illusion and the uneasy feeling that the wall is breathing in and out. Another perceptual oddity is that the solid stones are so slick that they look liquid, like globules of black oil. This illusion of material transformation, along with the dynamic patterning and the effect it has on the supporting wall all make for a kind of visual instability and volatility.

The dynamic patterning of Projection Screen is also a feature of the largest work in the show, appropriately titled Epic. Fernandez installed thousands of small chunks of raw graphite across an expansive wall in a design suggestive of interconnected swarms of flying birds, insects or the charged particles of a dust cloud. The solid bits of drawing material and the smudges on the wall coalesce into a sprawling and turbulent topography. Other, fully three-dimensional works titled Dune, Drawn Waters and Ink Mirror also evoke artificial landscapes. In these works, beads become golden sand, graphite becomes rocky terrain and marble dust becomes crystalline snow, respectively. All the works in Blind Landscape have a seductive pull that confounds the sense of sight, making one want to reach out and touch them. These abstracted landscapes are some of the most perceptually rewarding and sensual works of conceptual art that Texas has seen in a long time.

Lawrence Jennings is an artist who teaches at San Antonio College.