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Teresita Fernández

PRESS

The Brooklyn Rail

May 1, 2017

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The Art Newspaper

March 4, 2017

News

The future of the arts is Latinx: Q&A with artist Teresita Fernandez

October 5 2016

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Art21

September 24, 2016

News

Discovering the World From Nature's Many Perspectives Hyperallergic

December 31 2015

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Women in Art: Teresita Fernández

November 30 2015

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At Grace Farms, Encountering Art at Every Bend New York Times

November 28 2015

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Interview with Sculptor Teresita Fernández Aesthetica Magazine

November 24 2015

News

Sculpting the Public: Teresita Fernández Wants You In Her Work Modern Painters

October 31 2015

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Grace Farms Draws Praise Stamford Advocate

October 19 2015

News

The Spiritual and Spectacular Meet at an Ultramodern Community Center in Connecticut New York Times

October 16 2015

News

Poetry Under Fata Morgana Organized by Teresita Fernández and Emanuel Xavier

September 17 2015

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ArtNexus Teresita Fernández. Fata Morgana.

August 11, 2015

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Arte al Dia International

June 2015

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Cultured Magazine

April 18, 2015

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WSJ Artist Teresita Fernández Transforms New York’s Madison Square Park

March 31, 2015

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Departures Magazine Artist of the Moment: Teresita Fernández

January 9, 2015

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Gothamist Massive 500-Foot-Long Canopy Coming To Madison Square Park

November 11, 2014

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New York Times

November 6, 2014

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Modern Art Notes Podcast

August 18, 2014

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W Magazine

July 17, 2014

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The Brooklyn Rail

July/August 2014

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Sculpture

November 2013

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Art Bahrain

Fall 2013 - Winter 2014

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Architectural Digest

October 2013

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Modern Painters

October 2013

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South China Morning Post

September 26, 2013

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Whitewall

February 1, 2013

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W Magazine

October 2012

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The Wall Street Journal

September 14, 2012

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Artinfo

September 12, 2012

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Bloomberg

September 5, 2012

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Whitewall

November 30, 2011

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W Magazine

November 30, 2011

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The New York Observer

September 19, 2011

News

White House Appoints Artist Teresita Fernandez to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts

September 2011

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Art in Asia

August 31, 2011

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Artdaily

May 26, 2011

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artdaily

January 31, 2011

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Artinfo

November 16, 2010

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Financial Times

April 9, 2010

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Bob Magazine Issue 67

February 28, 2010

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Artforum

February 28, 2010

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Art Lies

February 28, 2010

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Monocle

October 31, 2009

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Anne Stringfield Interview

October 31, 2009

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David Norr Essay

October 31, 2009

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Dave Hickey Essay

October 31, 2009

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Annette DiMeo Carlozzi Essay

October 31, 2009

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The Business Times

September 19, 2009

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Artforum

August 31, 2009

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St. Petersburg Times

August 23, 2009

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Dallas Morning News

August 8, 2009

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...might be good

February 6, 2009

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Blackbird

August 31, 2008

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Vogue

April 1, 2007

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Tema Celeste

October 22, 2005

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USA Today

September 20, 2005

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ArtNexus

June 1, 2005

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ArtReview

April 1, 2005

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Art + Auction

March 1, 2005

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Art in America

November 1, 2003

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Art in America

March 1, 2003

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Art in America

December 1, 2001

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ARTnews

September 1, 2001

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New York Times

March 21, 1999

Annette DiMeo Carlozzi Essay


STACKED WATERS
2009

By Annette DiMeo Carlozzi
From the book Teresita Fernández:Blind Landscape. Published by the USF Contemporary Art Museum and JRP-Ringier, 2009

In a massive interior space of complex geometries, a simple illusion has been constructed. A vision of deep water beckons, framed by arches, like a postcard view. Grounding an atrium rising to diagonal skylights, a grand stair and two lengths of an arcade lead to exhibition galleries—while the fiction unfolds in all directions. The watery blue surround shimmers and floats, illuminated by changing Texas light, which it absorbs and reflects throughout the day. Thousands of precisely measured acrylic strips ascend the walls, accompany the stairs, and lend the monumental entry a unified spatial coherence and the feeling of art museum-arrival. Configured horizontally, the stripes of stylized swirl gradually shift in color as they scale the walls, creating what the artist calls "a colored abstraction that fades from deep blue to white at the top." Mercurial in nature, responding to nature, the newly commissioned work heightens the experience of ongoing change. Visitors move within this scenario, lured by the image yet fully aware of its fabrication.

Titled Stacked Waters in a nod to Donald Judd's boxes, the work suggests that the space is a container—of experience, certainly, history, perhaps, but most lyrically, a vessel of water, a cistern, pool, or ancient bath. Subliminally, the museum has been introduced as a place of material, and even bodily, transformation. Where one is located becomes a question of interpretation, and self-consciousness is triggered, whether through submission to the fantasy or simply acknowledgment of the body's reflection on the polished, mirror-like walls. Immersed, indeed at first seemingly submerged inside, the visitor ultimately "emerges" from the illusion at the top of the stairs more bodily aware, actively engaged in image-making, having negotiated some of the poetic tensions between what is and what may be—perfect preparation for the pleasures of careful looking promised by the galleries beyond.

Investigating the act of looking is central to Teresita Fernández's work. She explores the reverberations between seeing what exists before one's eyes and perception, a seemingly more subjective process of recognition. Meticulous and subtle, her works trigger kinesthetic sensations, prompt memories and associations, unleash new perceptions that challenge what is logically known. In Stacked Waters, her custom-cast acrylic surface features a stylized, ripple pattern that suggests flow, but such an organic allusion is directly contradicted by the installation's handcrafted precision. Its measured vertical layers, conspicuous pattern shifts and seams, and disjunctive stair-stepped color merges all call attention to the artificial construction of this pseudo-aquatic environment. The mind struggles to envision a cool and bountiful volume of water even as it calculates the mathematical inter-relationships of six surrounding planes.

Since the mid-1990s Fernández has developed myriad sculptural scenarios that envelope the viewer. At the same time, she has been intrigued by a particular design of architect Adolph Loos: his 1928 unrealized swimming pool for performer Josephine Baker. In that little-known masterpiece, Loos imagined voyeuristic one-way windows that would provide intermittent underwater views of swimmer Baker to visiting guests. In Stacked Waters, bodies occupy space in a playful manner related both to Loos' implied cinema and to the way that Judd's containers choreograph light; this was made apparent in a thrilling choral performance held recently in the atrium. Over 100 singers ranged up the grand staircase and around the mezzanine level above, while below, an audience of approximately the same size moved throughout the space peripatetically, experiencing the sights and sounds from vantage points of their own choosing. The audience's meanderings, spontaneous and sensorially driven, activated the space to its most dynamic capacity, filling Stacked Waters with both actual and reflected activity, the lines between viewer and performer, body and image dissolving as effectively as the architecture around them.