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Teresita Fernández

PRESS

The Brooklyn Rail

May 1, 2017

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The Art Newspaper

March 4, 2017

News

The future of the arts is Latinx: Q&A with artist Teresita Fernandez

October 5 2016

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Art21

September 24, 2016

News

Discovering the World From Nature's Many Perspectives Hyperallergic

December 31 2015

News

Women in Art: Teresita Fernández

November 30 2015

News

At Grace Farms, Encountering Art at Every Bend New York Times

November 28 2015

News

Interview with Sculptor Teresita Fernández Aesthetica Magazine

November 24 2015

News

Sculpting the Public: Teresita Fernández Wants You In Her Work Modern Painters

October 31 2015

News

Grace Farms Draws Praise Stamford Advocate

October 19 2015

News

The Spiritual and Spectacular Meet at an Ultramodern Community Center in Connecticut New York Times

October 16 2015

News

Poetry Under Fata Morgana Organized by Teresita Fernández and Emanuel Xavier

September 17 2015

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ArtNexus Teresita Fernández. Fata Morgana.

August 11, 2015

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Arte al Dia International

June 2015

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Cultured Magazine

April 18, 2015

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WSJ Artist Teresita Fernández Transforms New York’s Madison Square Park

March 31, 2015

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Departures Magazine Artist of the Moment: Teresita Fernández

January 9, 2015

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Gothamist Massive 500-Foot-Long Canopy Coming To Madison Square Park

November 11, 2014

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New York Times

November 6, 2014

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Modern Art Notes Podcast

August 18, 2014

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W Magazine

July 17, 2014

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The Brooklyn Rail

July/August 2014

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Sculpture

November 2013

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Art Bahrain

Fall 2013 - Winter 2014

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Architectural Digest

October 2013

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Modern Painters

October 2013

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South China Morning Post

September 26, 2013

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Whitewall

February 1, 2013

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W Magazine

October 2012

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The Wall Street Journal

September 14, 2012

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Artinfo

September 12, 2012

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Bloomberg

September 5, 2012

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Whitewall

November 30, 2011

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W Magazine

November 30, 2011

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The New York Observer

September 19, 2011

News

White House Appoints Artist Teresita Fernandez to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts

September 2011

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Art in Asia

August 31, 2011

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Artdaily

May 26, 2011

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artdaily

January 31, 2011

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Artinfo

November 16, 2010

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Financial Times

April 9, 2010

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Bob Magazine Issue 67

February 28, 2010

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Artforum

February 28, 2010

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Art Lies

February 28, 2010

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Monocle

October 31, 2009

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Anne Stringfield Interview

October 31, 2009

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David Norr Essay

October 31, 2009

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Dave Hickey Essay

October 31, 2009

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Annette DiMeo Carlozzi Essay

October 31, 2009

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The Business Times

September 19, 2009

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Artforum

August 31, 2009

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St. Petersburg Times

August 23, 2009

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Dallas Morning News

August 8, 2009

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...might be good

February 6, 2009

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Blackbird

August 31, 2008

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Vogue

April 1, 2007

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Tema Celeste

October 22, 2005

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USA Today

September 20, 2005

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ArtNexus

June 1, 2005

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ArtReview

April 1, 2005

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Art + Auction

March 1, 2005

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Art in America

November 1, 2003

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Art in America

March 1, 2003

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Art in America

December 1, 2001

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ARTnews

September 1, 2001

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New York Times

March 21, 1999

Arte al Dia International

June 2015

Teresita Fernández: As Above So Below
MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA
By: Julia P. Herzberg, Ph.D.


Teresita Fernández, a MacArthur Fellow admired for such sculptural projects as Stacked Waters (2009), Seattle Cloud Cover (2004-2006), and Fire (2005), is one of the most outstanding contemporary artists of her generation working in the United States today. By embracing the subject of landscape as a sculptural possibility in a myriad of accomplished forms, mediums, and materials, the artist's extraordinary exhibition at MASS MoCA, As Above So Below, explores space, place, and time as perceived by the "ambulatory viewer."


For this long-planned exhibition, Fernández has created an extensive series of new three-dimensional drawings made with india ink on reflective gold-chrome panels titled Golden; three large-scale, site-specific installations: Sfumato (Epic), Lunar (Theater), and Black Sun; and two sculptures: Bonsai and Rorschach.  The exhibition's curator, Denise Markonish, rightly asserts that this new body of work furthers the artist's inquiries into landscape painting, mining, and the connections between the cosmos and the subterranean.


Each work, regardless of size or format, aims to elicit an awareness that the intimate is always present in the vast, and conversely, the immense is contained in the miniature; so that the very big and the very small are inside of each other. As if in a container-each refers to the other.


Sfumato (Epic), the first work encountered upon entering the galleries, is a wall installation composed of forty thousand small hand-cut rocks of raw mined graphite with hand-drawn marks extending from each rock. This installation, which in its entirety spans eight gallery walls, is at once large and small, depending on the viewer's positioning and focus (read, act of seeing). I felt totally immersed in the sweeping compositional structure, which reminded me of a slow-moving terrestrial storm. The artist, who has used graphite in earlier work- with equal distinction in Drawn Water (Borrowdale) and Epic—refers to the mineral, once mined from enormous deposits in the valley of Borrowdale in England(16th century), and its use by Renaissance artists in their drawings.


In the next gallery, following the internal progression of the exhibition, the viewer comes face to face with Golden (As Above So Below), a grand work on gold chroming and india ink on three wood panels. This work, similar to others titled Golden, pulls you into the gold, reflective surface, making us the ambulatory viewer.


While walking slowly from one end of the sculpture-drawing to the other, we discover the details of a near, middle, and distant landscape--with trees, mountains, sky, and a dark subterranean ground- as well as our own image.


The subtitles of Golden (Obsidian Sea), Golden (Onyx Sky), and Golden (Obsidian Sky) alternately reference the sea and the sky. Each requires the same kind of attentive viewing in slow time from close up and from a distance. Golden (Obsidian Sea) features the outlines of large, dark billowing clouds streaked with rain above a miniature landscape so defined by the barely visible silhouettes of distant hills on the horizon line. The subterranean level, rendered in dark black ink, reveals tiny dots on the gold surface, suggesting breathing spaces in the earth. Golden (Onyx Sky) reverses the scale of the sky and the ground. The larger, upper area represents a vast, dark sky with irregular openings on the gold surface, reminding one of twinkling stars, as if viewed through a telescope.  The lower area, drawn with lines and abstract figurations, suggests a lava flow. While walking in front of Onyx Sky and Obsidian Sky, the viewer's reflection appears as a moving shadow within them.  Fernández conceived each work in proportion to the large size of the galleries at MASS MoCA. Visually and conceptually concerned with the relationship between the small and the large and the intimate and the vast, the artist produced very different sizes of gold chroming and india ink panels. She radically shifted the scale of Golden (Scroll l ), for example, to a height of 12 inches and a length of 108 inches. The narrow, horizontal landscape is separated into two scenes: daylight and darkness. As we move from left to right in front of the reflective surface, the images of rocks and their crevices fade, as in a filmic dissolve, one delicately highlighted by miniscule openings on the gold chroming surface.  This work, similar to Golden (Scroll 2), seems to be inspired by Chinese landscape paintings on scrolls. Once again our eye follows the pitch black of the subterranean ground to the outlines of the mountains in the distance-a sublime scene with a partially stormy, partially clear sky, all in the space of one foot.


Among the very small works in this exhibition is the abstract sculpture Bonsai, a work of fused nylon and gold chroming, not much more than seven inches. While the miniature tree is not realistically formed, it is perfectly fabricated within the thematic proposals of Golden. Since the bonsai mimics the shape and style of mature, full-size trees, it is one of the very small specimens that live within or are contained as part of larger ones.


Black Sun, composed of thousands of translucent colored tubes, is suspended from the ceiling from a height of three stories. A row of windows on the upper level of the gallery wall casts light on the colored tubes as their shades change from black to grey to yellow, orange, and back again to black. The chromatic gradations are spectacularly beautiful. The installation compels the ambulatory viewer to walk under it, look upward and feel the allure and fascination of a changing sky. Similar feelings are aroused when looking down from the third floor, recalling the sensorial details of atmospheric variations from storm patterns to clear skies.


In Lunar Theater, shimmering glass reflecting beads made from sand (extracted from underground) were tossed by the thousands in very controlled gestures, forming undulating patterns on the gold floor. From one end of the installation to the other, the beads, suggestive of foam, appear as ripples under the changing natural light that enters from the wall of windows. Although most of the beads fell into the desired configuration, many rolled randomly into positions around the matrix, offering a perceptive experience of the water as moving sand.


Teresita Fernández has long been challenged with finding a language through which her sculpture would change the visual expectations of the sea, land, underground, sky, or minerals while still referring to them. And she thoroughly mines these possibilities in As Above So Below.