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Teresita Fernández

PRESS

The Brooklyn Rail

May 1, 2017

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The Art Newspaper

March 4, 2017

News

The future of the arts is Latinx: Q&A with artist Teresita Fernandez

October 5 2016

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Art21

September 24, 2016

News

Discovering the World From Nature's Many Perspectives Hyperallergic

December 31 2015

News

Women in Art: Teresita Fernández

November 30 2015

News

At Grace Farms, Encountering Art at Every Bend New York Times

November 28 2015

News

Interview with Sculptor Teresita Fernández Aesthetica Magazine

November 24 2015

News

Sculpting the Public: Teresita Fernández Wants You In Her Work Modern Painters

October 31 2015

News

Grace Farms Draws Praise Stamford Advocate

October 19 2015

News

The Spiritual and Spectacular Meet at an Ultramodern Community Center in Connecticut New York Times

October 16 2015

News

Poetry Under Fata Morgana Organized by Teresita Fernández and Emanuel Xavier

September 17 2015

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ArtNexus Teresita Fernández. Fata Morgana.

August 11, 2015

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Arte al Dia International

June 2015

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Cultured Magazine

April 18, 2015

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WSJ Artist Teresita Fernández Transforms New York’s Madison Square Park

March 31, 2015

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Departures Magazine Artist of the Moment: Teresita Fernández

January 9, 2015

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Gothamist Massive 500-Foot-Long Canopy Coming To Madison Square Park

November 11, 2014

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New York Times

November 6, 2014

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Modern Art Notes Podcast

August 18, 2014

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W Magazine

July 17, 2014

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The Brooklyn Rail

July/August 2014

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Sculpture

November 2013

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Art Bahrain

Fall 2013 - Winter 2014

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Architectural Digest

October 2013

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Modern Painters

October 2013

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South China Morning Post

September 26, 2013

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Whitewall

February 1, 2013

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W Magazine

October 2012

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The Wall Street Journal

September 14, 2012

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Artinfo

September 12, 2012

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Bloomberg

September 5, 2012

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Whitewall

November 30, 2011

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W Magazine

November 30, 2011

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The New York Observer

September 19, 2011

News

White House Appoints Artist Teresita Fernandez to the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts

September 2011

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Art in Asia

August 31, 2011

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Artdaily

May 26, 2011

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artdaily

January 31, 2011

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Artinfo

November 16, 2010

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Financial Times

April 9, 2010

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Bob Magazine Issue 67

February 28, 2010

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Artforum

February 28, 2010

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Art Lies

February 28, 2010

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Monocle

October 31, 2009

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Anne Stringfield Interview

October 31, 2009

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David Norr Essay

October 31, 2009

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Dave Hickey Essay

October 31, 2009

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Annette DiMeo Carlozzi Essay

October 31, 2009

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The Business Times

September 19, 2009

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Artforum

August 31, 2009

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St. Petersburg Times

August 23, 2009

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Dallas Morning News

August 8, 2009

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...might be good

February 6, 2009

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Blackbird

August 31, 2008

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Vogue

April 1, 2007

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Tema Celeste

October 22, 2005

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USA Today

September 20, 2005

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ArtNexus

June 1, 2005

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ArtReview

April 1, 2005

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Art + Auction

March 1, 2005

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Art in America

November 1, 2003

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Art in America

March 1, 2003

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Art in America

December 1, 2001

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ARTnews

September 1, 2001

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New York Times

March 21, 1999

Art in America


TURIN
Teresita Fernandez at Castello di Rivoli
BY ANN WILSON LLOYD

In works based on formal garden elements, Teresita Fernandez located seductive powers within the artifice of manufactured landscape and materials. This show featured five large, discrete sculptures made of plastic, vinyl, acrylic and aluminum. While they interacted as a whole, just as carefully planned ponds, waterfalls and arbors are meant to, the glistening, oversized Waterfall (2000) stood out at 12 by 12 by 28 feet.

This swooping, slidelike piece consisting of narrow strips of pearly blue and white plastic (reminiscent of retro bathroom decor) suggested the color of water as it tumbles and froths. The sleek, laminated surface presented water only as flat stylzation, just as the minimal sculptural form, which started on the wall at head height and then curved out and down to the floor, only suggested a waterfall. Viewers could walk behind the wall of plastic water, but instead of Niagara's mist, they saw the clean lines of an aluminum armature. From the side, one saw the perfect edge of its arcing plane, like an undulating blue line drawing. Despite all the water references, the piece also looked like a roll-out patio awning with one side flopped down on the ground.

Meanwhile, the rainbow often seen in waterfall mist was frozen in place on an adjoining wall. Titled 3:37 p.m. (2001), this piece was also made of hundreds of small, intricately arranged bits— here, 1-inch cubes of clear acrylic underlain with squares of colored paper, arranged in a horizontal, 23-foot color spectrum of red to violet, with carefully blended areas between each color shift. Despite its geometric incorrectness, the piece was nearly as mesmerizing as the natural phenomenon it represented.

In the next room, Pond (2001), a dark, 16-foot-square floor piece, used the same cube arrangements to simulate shimmering green lily pads. Forming a backdrop to Pond were two delicate cloudlike wall pieces, Wisteria (Green), 2001, and Wisteria (Yellow), 2000, both made of white plastic panels die-cut into looping computer-designed patterns and backed with colored vinyl that cast a subtle glow on the wall. Similar pieces by Fernandez have been placed in crowded group shows elsewhere with less effect; here they hovered in the background like an afterimage, the visual equivalent of a lingering fragrance.

Even though Fernandez's works are reductive and employ nonorganic materials and forms, they remain both sensual and contemplative. Presented together, they delivered a delightful account of landscape conventions and the primal responses that these conventions evoke.