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Juergen Teller

PRESS

Purple Magazine

September 24, 2016

News

Juergen Teller & Xiang Jing Champ Magazine

September 30 2015

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Baccarat

June/August 2015

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Musée Magazine

November 2014

News

Artinfo Shock of the Nude: Juergen Teller Photographs Go on View at the ICA

February 6, 2013

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London Evening Standard

January 23, 2013

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Artinfo

January 22, 2013

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The Guardian

January 5, 2013

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Artforum

January 2013

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Style.com

September 12, 2012

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Style.com

March 30, 2012

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Nowness

February 20, 2012

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Artinfo

February 13, 2012

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New York Magazine

February 11, 2012

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Vogue

February 9, 2012

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Harper's Bazaar

February 8, 2012

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Hint Magazine

January 31, 2012

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Dallas Contemporary

August 31, 2011

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T Magazine

July 28, 2011

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Dallas Observer

May 19, 2011

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The Block

January 20, 2011

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New York Times

January 11, 2011

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W Magazine

October 31, 2010

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Artforum

December 3, 2009

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The New York Times

September 25, 2009

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Vanity Fair

September 21, 2009

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The Moment: The New York Times Blog

September 1, 2009

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W

August 31, 2009

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New York Magazine Straight Shooter

August 17, 2008

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The New York Times

April 10, 2008

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Modern Painters

March 1, 2006

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Women's Wear Daily

January 17, 2006

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Artforum

January 1, 2005

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Time Out New York

October 9, 2003

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Art Newspaper

September 18, 2003

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The Observer

September 14, 2003

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Financial Times

September 5, 2003

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Independent Magazine

September 1, 2003

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i-D Magazine

September 1, 2003

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Observer Magazine

April 6, 2003

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American Photo

January 1, 2002

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i-D Magazine

November 1, 2001

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W

July 1, 2000

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Time Out New York

June 22, 2000

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New York Times

June 4, 2000

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Contemporary Visual Arts

June 1, 2000

Time Out New York


Juergen Teller at Lehmann Maupin
through Jul 7
BY REENA JANA

If the renowned German photographer August Sander were reborn in today's fashion world, he would be Juergen Teller. Indeed, Teller's "Go-Sees" series—which features photo after photo of supermodel wanna-bes who have been sent by agencies to his studio seems to be a sexy, more glamorous version of Sander's famous photographic typology of '20s Weimar society, Citizens of the Twentieth Century. Teller similarly composes informal portraits of his subjects in their everyday clothes, and he invites viewers to draw their own conclusions about human nature, based on the artist's deliberately repetitive approach to his subject.

So what do we learn from these images of nubile girls in tight clothing, which Teller mounts en masse on plain white boards? Sure, we're reminded of what's being considered sexy today. But eventually, we see past the generic long hair and long legs, and notice the Goth girl in Go-Sees: April, with her black-nailed hands clasped in prayer and the Josephine Baker look-alike in Go-Sees: May. We appreciate the ghostly pale, androgynous girl of Go-Sees: November, who pulls her hair back and smirks sarcastically instead of pouting. We grow sad when, after thinking we've seen the same bleached-blond contortionist appear in Go-Sees: September, Go-Sees: June and Go-Sees: May, we realize that the images actually feature three different clone-like, desperate girls.

Also on view are Teller's large, close-up shots of international beauty queens which have not only the deadpan feei of Sander's work, but also the wow-look-at-all-those-pores effect of Chuck Close paintings. Especially striking are the tarantulalike eyelashes of each girl, a result of overdone mascara, not to mention the glassy eyes and forced smiles that give the models the creepy aura of Stepford wives. Undercutting the airbrush tradition of fashion shoots, the photos show the pimples on Miss France's chest and the messy lipstick and copious facial hair of Miss Canada. Teller somehow manages to capture not only the vulgarity but the humanity of these women and, as a result, evokes a poignant sense of pathos instead of bathos.