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Museum of Fine Arts, ...
Jennifer Steinkamp: Mike Kelley Projection...

October 19 – 26, 2014

museum exhibition

Albright-Knox Gallery
Jennifer Steinkamp

March 14 – June 29, 2008

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Jennifer Steinkamp

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Rhizome Seven on Seven Conference Jennifer Steinkamp & Rana el Kaliouby

May 14 2016

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Women Are Taking Over This Year's 'Seven on Seven' Conference

April 16 2016

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The Los Angeles Times

July 15, 2014

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Architectural Digest

February 24, 2014

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South China Morning Post

February 13, 2014

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The Houston Chronicle

June 21, 2012

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Artinfo

December 1, 2011

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San Diego City Beat

April 5, 2011

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Wall Street Journal

January 20, 2011

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Switched

September 11, 2010

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Whitewall

September 10, 2010

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Interview

September 7, 2010

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WWD

August 31, 2010

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ARTnews

March 31, 2010

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Flavorpill's Daily Dose

January 28, 2009

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Men.Style.com Jennifer's Flowers

September 5, 2008

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The Moment: The New York Times blog The Insider | Jennifer Steinkamp

September 3, 2008

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Art + Auction Making Noise

August 31, 2008

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Los Angeles Times Jennifer Steinkamp dazzles at ACME

June 13, 2008

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NYTimes-T Magazine

October 1, 2007

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ARTnews

July 1, 2007

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Art in America

March 1, 2007

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ArtForum

January 2, 2007

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New York Times

July 1, 2005

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ARTnews

June 1, 2004

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ARTnews

April 1, 2004

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Frieze

April 1, 2004

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Art in America

December 1, 2003

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Artforum

February 1, 2003

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RES Magazine

January 1, 2003

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Los Angeles Times

December 20, 2002

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Los Angeles Times

March 3, 2000

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Artweek

October 1, 1998

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art/text

August 1, 1997

Los Angeles Times


ART; AROUND THE GALLERIES; A quiet riot, in a hothouse setting
By David Pagel

At a time when mindless spectacles are filling museums and American culture is being so aggressively dumbed down that art is on the verge of becoming an underground movement, it's heartening to see the new video installation by Jennifer Steinkamp at Acme Gallery. Titled "Jimmy Carter," the L.A. artist's silent light show is a blast from the past that provides some respite from the horrors of modern life while never making the mistake that art's job is to serve up escapist entertainment.

Thoughtful and ravishing, Steinkamp's dazzling piece of participatory theater is as accessible as anything on television -- and as imaginative as the best art in any medium. It's radical because its optimism is not pie-in-the-sky utopianism but down-to- earth, this-is-it realism. To spend more than a few moments in the darkened gallery is to experience your mind and body working in concert, cooperating to process the generous sensory extravaganza.

Three walls are covered with projected images of thousands of flowers Steinkamp designed on a computer. Arranged in rows that run from floor to ceiling, the artificial asters, chrysanthemums, lilies, orchids and tulips form a rainbow of blazing colors -- screaming yellows, glorious oranges, off-key periwinkles -- all punctuated by verdant greens and gaps of absolute blackness. It's hard to say whether you've stepped into an electronically transmitted hothouse or are somehow standing inside a giant stripe painting whose molecular structure forms an impossible cosmos.

And that's only the beginning. Steinkamp has set her wallflowers in motion. All the rows sway sinuously, in the manner of sea grass pulled back and forth by the surf. Individual blossoms buck the current, their stems and petals bending and twisting. Imagine a meadow jam-packed with flowers so eager to reproduce that they can't wait for bees to pollinate them. The flowers make jittery movements, zipping out of formation to cross-pollinate before looping back into place.

Up close, the cinematic image disintegrates into a grid of pixels that occasionally sit still but never for long. To stand back and take in the whole is to see patterns begin to take shape, only to dissolve into apparent chaos. But Steinkamp's carefully orchestrated disorder inspires a wider perspective, a big-picture view in which everything just might make sense -- if your imagination's up to the challenge.

Back in the 1950s, Harold Rosenberg coined the term "apocalyptic wallpaper" to describe abstract paintings that failed to convey the aspirations of their makers. Steinkamp's installation turns Rosenberg's term into a virtue: a work of art that is scintillating and scary, aware of its place in the world and bold enough to fly in the face of business as usual.