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Hernan Bas

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Hernan Bas Modern Painters

June 1 2016

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Hernan Bas on Painting Aristocratic, Queer Life in 1920s London Hyperallergic

April 13 2016

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The Lookout: Hernan Bas at Lehmann Maupin Art in America

March 30 2016

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Hernan Bas: Illustrated Answers with Neo-Romantic Painter NeueJournal

March 29 2016

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Bohemia, By Way of the Aristocrats New York Times

March 10 2016

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12 Things to Do in New York’s Art World Before March 11 New York Observer

March 7 2016

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FIAC 2015 Opens with Strong Sales ARTINFO

October 22 2015

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Hong Kong Tatler

May 7, 2014

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Elephant Magazine

Spring 2014

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Art21

July 10, 2012

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The Korea Herald

June 19, 2012

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Huffington Post

April 11, 2012

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Bomb

April 10, 2012

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Art Observed

April 4, 2012

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Mediabistro

March 22, 2012

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Artlog

March 16, 2012

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Opening Ceremony

March 16, 2012

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Artinfo

March 13, 2012

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Interview

February 29, 2012

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WWD

February 29, 2012

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Flash Art

September 30, 2009

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Flash Art

June 30, 2009

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NBC Miami

May 21, 2009

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Miami New Times

May 21, 2009

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BlackBook

May 20, 2009

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Whitewall

May 6, 2009

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The Miami Herald

May 3, 2009

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Manhattan

April 30, 2009

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Time Out New York

April 23, 2009

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Artnet TV

April 9, 2009

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Art Review

March 31, 2009

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Vogue

February 28, 2009

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WWD.com

February 27, 2009

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Artnet

February 1, 2009

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The Advocate

January 31, 2009

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Artdaily.org

January 12, 2009

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Wound

March 31, 2008

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Elle Decor

March 31, 2008

Bomb


Bomb
April 10, 2012

Bomb Bits: Hernan Bas’ Occult Contemporary
By Kari Adelaide

Hernan Bas’s exhibition, Occult Contemporary, presents a tarnished and transitory landscape where storytelling occurs in a realm of stillness. Bas frequently deals with supernatural and fantastical elements (fairies, vampires, and chimerical creatures), and this body of work introduces the allegorical habitation of fallen angels. Within his radiant and gothic paintings, pervasive forces and shadowy figures are languidly positioned within faintly illumined woods, with an oddly eerie and serene presence of being. Bas’s fabrication of wilderness, with massive twisting roots, severed trunks and fallen timbre, depicts oblivion and a contemplation of loss. In the midst of this doom and meditation is an irreversible passage of time (symbolized by the passage of water). The beings and situations within the narrative renderings seem nearly petrified, and beyond the entangled woodland enclosures there are suggestions of action, movement, and possibility: we see rivers and bridges leading somewhere, revealing a timeless allegory of choice and potential for change. Bas asserts how the works are distanced from any autobiographical elements, but he acknowledges that recently moving to Detroit may have influenced the depictions of nature overcoming idleness, collapse, and decay, leading to an entangled and chaotic quasi-naturalized genesis of wreckage.