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Gilbert & George: Art Exhibition

June 14 – November 2, 2014

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Gilbert & George

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Gilbert & George to create gallery in London's East End The Guardian

June 5 2016

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Video Exclusive: Gilbert & George's F**kosophy ARTINFO

December 30 2015

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The Genius of Gilbert & George's Pictures at MONA Tasmania ARTINFO

December 12 2015

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Seeing red: Gilbert & George still fired up after more than 40 years of making art Sydney Morning Herald

November 27 2015

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My London: Gilbert & George Christie's

October 15 2015

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Daily Life as Art in Gilbert & George's Early Works Hyperallergic

July 24 2015

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The Wall Street Journal

September 5, 2014

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Artforum

August 1, 2014

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Hyperallergic

July 30, 2014

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Time Out New York

July 10-16, 2014

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Gilbert & George: Art Exhibition Nouveau Musée National de Monaco - Villa Paloma, Monaco

June 14-November 2, 2014

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The New York TImes

July 18, 2013

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Gallerist NY

July 18, 2013

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Whitewall

Winter 2013

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ARTnews

October 2012

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Art Unlimited 2012 at Art | 43 | Basel Gilbert & George: A LONDON PICTURE

14-17 June 2012

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New York Magazine

May 14, 2012

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Huffington Post

May 8, 2012

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May 3, 2012

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Art in America

May 1, 2012

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April 30, 2012

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LONDON PICTURES Book Signing Gilbert & George

April 28, 2012, 1-3 PM

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Wall Street Journal

April 28, 2012

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Artinfo

April 27, 2012

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New York Observer: Gallerist NY

April 24, 2012

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The Guardian

March 2, 2012

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March 1, 2012

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The Talks

September 7, 2011

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Artinfo

March 3, 2011

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The Independent

January 27, 2011

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London Evening Standard

January 7, 2011

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Art In America

July 16, 2010

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New York Times Provocative Duo, Naked and Natty

October 3, 2008

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Art In America The Human Theater of Gilbert & George

September 30, 2008

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New York Times Style Magazine

December 1, 2007

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Modern Painters

May 1, 2007

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Art + Auction

July 1, 2005

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Modern Painters

June 1, 2005

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Artforum

March 1, 2005

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ARTnews

February 22, 2005

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Art in America

February 1, 2005

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New York Times

December 3, 2004

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ArtReview

July 1, 2004

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Art in America

October 1, 1997

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Paper

June 1, 1997

Art in America


Gilbert & George at Sonnabend and Lehmann Maupin
By Eleanor Heartney

Against the stiff competition provided by the likes of Damien Hirst and the Chapman brothers, Gilbert & George are intent on reclaiming their positions as the biggest bad boys of contemporary British art. This massive two-gallery exhibition was composed of huge photo-based paintings whose titles are liberally sprinkled with scatological terms more commonly found on the walls of lavatories. Inscribed in large capital letters on the canvases, these words offer keys to the otherwise largely abstract photographic imagery which unfurls monumentally behind them.

Spread over two galleries, the litany of nasty words—most popular among them are "spunk," "piss" "shit" as well as the more simply descriptive "blood," "spit" and "tears"—becomes mind-numbing after a while. The imagery, except for the recurring representations of enormous cigar-shaped turds, is less overtly offensive. In fact (and this is clearly part of the point), some of the abstract patterns that result from the enlargement of microscopic images of semen, urine, blood and spittle are quite beautiful. The cellular structure of blood, for instance, makes for intricately interlocked mosaics in red and black or red and white. Piss, rendered in black and white against a bright yellow ground, presents kaleidoscopic patterns that bring to mind frost spreading in tiny fingers across a windowpane. Spunk resembles a volcanic landscape.

For some time there have been religious references in the duo's work. Previously, these have centered on beautiful, working-class boys enshrined as objects of desire in cathedral-like spaces. Here, in the boys' stead, we have the artists themselves. Frequently naked, they float before backdrops composed of cosmic arrangements of the fluid motifs. Generally the poses reinforce the artists' deadpan inversion of respectability. Gilbert & George take turns mooning viewers or standing stiffly at attention in their birthday suits. However in several works, the pair explicitly assume the personas of Adam and Eve, as in one work where they re-create the poses in Mantegna's Expulsion from Paradise.

The combination of such overt religious references with references to body fluids, the latter admittedly an important motif in Christian theology, suggests that the artists have more profound aspirations than their cheeky titles suggest. However, any genuine sublimity is undercut by the adolescent nature of their scatological fixations. While the works' crisp graphic style and simplified colors are often said to invoke stained glass windows, a prolonged stay in either gallery produced not so much reverential awe as a desire to escape the relentless confrontation with elementary body processes.

As a result, the artists' intentions remain ambiguous. Their preoccupation with body effluents may refer to the great Christian mysteries and the miraculous transfiguration of base matter into spirit. However, one is left with a stronger impression of schoolboys whispering dirty jokes in the last row of the church during Sunday services.