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Gilbert & George: Art Exhibition

June 14 – November 2, 2014

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Gilbert & George

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Gilbert & George to create gallery in London's East End The Guardian

June 5 2016

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Video Exclusive: Gilbert & George's F**kosophy ARTINFO

December 30 2015

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The Genius of Gilbert & George's Pictures at MONA Tasmania ARTINFO

December 12 2015

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Seeing red: Gilbert & George still fired up after more than 40 years of making art Sydney Morning Herald

November 27 2015

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My London: Gilbert & George Christie's

October 15 2015

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Daily Life as Art in Gilbert & George's Early Works Hyperallergic

July 24 2015

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The Wall Street Journal

September 5, 2014

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Artforum

August 1, 2014

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Hyperallergic

July 30, 2014

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Time Out New York

July 10-16, 2014

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Gilbert & George: Art Exhibition Nouveau Musée National de Monaco - Villa Paloma, Monaco

June 14-November 2, 2014

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The New York TImes

July 18, 2013

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Gallerist NY

July 18, 2013

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Whitewall

Winter 2013

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ARTnews

October 2012

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Art Unlimited 2012 at Art | 43 | Basel Gilbert & George: A LONDON PICTURE

14-17 June 2012

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New York Magazine

May 14, 2012

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Huffington Post

May 8, 2012

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V Magazine

May 3, 2012

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Art in America

May 1, 2012

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Artspace

April 30, 2012

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LONDON PICTURES Book Signing Gilbert & George

April 28, 2012, 1-3 PM

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Wall Street Journal

April 28, 2012

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Artinfo

April 27, 2012

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New York Observer: Gallerist NY

April 24, 2012

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The Guardian

March 2, 2012

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The Economist

March 1, 2012

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The Talks

September 7, 2011

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Artinfo

March 3, 2011

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The Independent

January 27, 2011

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London Evening Standard

January 7, 2011

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Art In America

July 16, 2010

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New York Times Provocative Duo, Naked and Natty

October 3, 2008

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Art In America The Human Theater of Gilbert & George

September 30, 2008

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New York Times Style Magazine

December 1, 2007

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Modern Painters

May 1, 2007

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Art + Auction

July 1, 2005

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Modern Painters

June 1, 2005

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Artforum

March 1, 2005

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ARTnews

February 22, 2005

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Art in America

February 1, 2005

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New York Times

December 3, 2004

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ArtReview

July 1, 2004

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Art in America

October 1, 1997

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Paper

June 1, 1997

V Magazine


V Magazine
May 03, 2012

The Religion of Gilbert & George
By Jenny Bahn

Gilbert & George appear this afternoon smartly dressed in their signature tweed suits, polite and well groomed. Behind them, images loom, giant and threatening, from their latest collection, London Pictures.

On minimalistic grids of black and white, loaded words scream in red from real newspaper headlines the two collected – well, technically, stole – from London newsagents over the last six years. Words like “RACIST”, “STABBING”, and “BOMB.” George and Gilbert stare forward from across the table, hands folded in their laps, the very antithesis of what surrounds them: a massive catalogue of work that reads like a morbid word association game. The vision is an incongruous one, and precisely what we have come to expect from the two.

Since meeting one other while students at London’s St. Martins School of Art in the late ’60s, the couple has been creating art together, starting first with their infamous “The Singing Sculpture” – think metallic face paint, a record player, Gilbert and George standing for hours on end singing Bud Flanagan’s 1931 hit, “Under The Arches.” It was one of the most successful moments in performance art and one that would mark the beginning a very long, very successful career of defying the status quo. Early on, Gilbert and George acquired a disdain for the profligate snobbery they found within the art world. Their solution was a rebellion: art against Art. “We realized that most of the artists – dear souls and charming people that they were – had an amazing condescending attitude to people outside of the art world,” George begins. “They thought everyone outside on the street was stupid and banal. And that’s just not true. Everybody walking on the street is amazing, complicated. In love, out of love. Working, not working. Traveling, not traveling. And so we started to think we would make art that would address everybody.”

Their work is one of a democratic inspiration. They are fascinated with the universal elements of the human condition: death, hope, life, fear, sex, money, race, religion. They are humanistic visionaries, making art for the people, inspired by the people. They, as the artists, see themselves as secondary. “We try to let the pictures make themselves with minimal interference from us,” George says. “Let them print themselves from how we are inside.”

“We don’t want to be very clever,” Gilbert professes humbly.

To maintain a purity of vision, they abstain from music, the cinema, and the art of their contemporaries. Gilbert, unapologetic in their refusal to engage with the cultural world, explains: “We are completely alone, no? Standing in front of this empty world. And that’s very good for making art.” This time around, the art’s preoccupations are with death and brutality, a culture of fear in which we are immersed in on a day-to-day basis but rarely pay attention to. For six years, Gilbert and George worked in a studio packed to the gills with what eventually totaled 3,712 posters sporting grisly headlines. “You began to see that they’re not just posters to sell newspapers; they’re actually huge human shames, sorrows, disasters,” George explains. Therein lies the vast complexity just beneath the simplicity of their work. These are not just words, images, posters. These are love letters to the ghosts of London, tributes to the tragedies endured by others and then forgotten quickly by the masses. “It’s a celebration of the lives and deaths of all those single people. They are immortalized now,” George says. Elaborating on that point, Gilbert continues: “We see these titles every day, and then the next day, another. You just forget everything. But we are freezing them. They are finished after one day, the posters. Life goes on. But here we can see what we actually do to each other.”

With a gentle hand and a stark palate, Gilbert and George shake the viewer awake, urging us to see what is going on around us. The world is a horrible and complex mess, full of inconsistencies and complications. This is life. And, as Gilbert and George see it, it is a work of art.